Spring HVAC Checklist

Posted on by WestAIR Heating & Cooling

spring hvac checklist

Some of the most pressing concerns for Minnesota homeowners are humidity levels, poor air quality, and increased utility bills. In the spring, those HVAC issues are a hot topic as the warm weather approaches. Follow our spring HVAC checklist to inspect and prepare your equipment for summer.

  1. Turn off power to your outdoor unit from the electrical disconnect and clear away plants, weeds, fallen leaves, and branches. Use a garden hose to gently rinse off the condenser coils. If the unit doesn’t get enough air or the coils are covered in dirt, it could overheat.
  2. Change your filter, and plan to do so monthly when your furnace and air conditioning are in use. Filters keep dust and dirt from entering your system, extend equipment life, reduce energy costs, and improve indoor air quality.   
  3. Clean return air vents and floor registers in your home with a vacuum. If dust gets in the system, it could compromise energy efficiency and air quality. For a deeper clean, remove the vent, wrap a butter knife in a rag to scrub the individual grill spaces, and rinse with warm water and soap.
  4. Check the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector(s) and replace if needed so you know it is working properly to keep your family safe.
  5. Caulk windows and doors to minimize air leakage so the cool air your system produces isn’t wasted. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the best time to apply caulk is in low humidity when the temperature is about 45 degrees, making spring the ideal time for this simple maintenance.
  6. Dust and mop so dirt, allergens, and other airborne particles don’t end up in your ductwork. Schedule duct cleaning if you haven’t done so in a while or you suspect your ductwork is dirty.
  7. Clean windows, blinds, and curtains so you can let the sunlight into your home and enjoy a clear view of the outdoors without producing a cloud of dust each time you open them.  
  8. Dust ceiling fan blades and reverse their direction to rotate counterclockwise so they’ll blow air straight down and produce a wind-chill effect. Most fan models have a small switch on the motor housing.
  9. Power up your air conditioning to see if everything is working properly. You should visually inspect the unit for any leaking chemical fluids and check your home for burning, gas, or musty odors.
  10. Schedule service with your HVAC contractor for a thorough inspection. They’ll clean, lubricate, and troubleshoot your equipment so it will run smoothly and efficiently.

Midwest summers can be particularly hot and sticky, and homeowners can spend up to 250 dollars a month running their air conditioner. WestAIR Heating & Cooling is here to help you save money in every season with a variety of specials on our services. We also provide indoor air quality solutions so you can minimize spring allergies and live comfortably. If you are having trouble with your HVAC system, contact us for repair and replacement services.

This entry was posted in Air Conditioning,Duct Cleaning,Indoor Air Quality,Repairs,Spring and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Reduce Indoor Humidity

Posted on by WestAIR Heating & Cooling

How to Reduce Indoor Humidity In the Midwest, we feel the weather to the extremes – below zero and dry in the winter to 90+ degrees and humid in the summer. For those summer months, many of us cool our homes with some sort of air conditioning, but the humidity still sticks around the house. Extra moisture makes the air feel warmer and damages your walls, floors, furniture, and cabinets. You can effectively reduce indoor humidity with three different products, but which one will work best for you?

Portable Dehumidifier

These units plug into any room and are suitable for homes with poor air circulation or no ventilation. Spaces like the basement, kitchen, or bathroom become susceptible to mold. Dishwashers, dryers, and showers add extra heat and moisture to your home. Portable dehumidifiers are the smartest solution for rooms that smell of must or feel damp and stale.

Whole House Dehumidifier

This system works best for old houses that use ductwork for heating and cooling. Older houses are prone to leaks and mold. If you often find condensation on your walls or you’ve had problems with mold before, you should consider a whole house dehumidifier. If you or a family member has asthma or chronic respiratory issues, humidity can aggravate your symptoms. Install a whole house dehumidifier to reduce moisture and improve your health.

Air Exchanger

An air exchanger has two channels of air flow, ventilating your home with fresh, filtered air.  One channel pulls outside air into the home, while the other pushes stale air out. This exchange removes humid air or pollutants. The air exchanger works seamlessly with your heating & cooling equipment to improve air quality. If you own a newer home and want a constant supply of fresh air, consider adding an air exchanger to your HVAC system.

Contact WestAIR Heating and Cooling to learn more about reducing humidity, improving indoor air quality, and installing an air exchanger in your home.

This entry was posted in AC,Air Conditioning,Cooling,Energy Savings,Indoor Air Quality and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why You Need a Whole-Home Humidifier

Posted on by WestAIR Heating & Cooling

whole-home humidifier
Did you know that the most comfortable indoor air humidity level is 40 to 60 percent? Cold air does not hold water vapor well, making it drier as it gets colder. Dry air could be the reason you get nose, throat, and skin discomfort in the winter.

What makes it worse?
Turning on your heat.

Heated air with low humidity also dries out the wood in your home, shrinking the wood framing around doors and windows. The shrinking causes gaps to occur and allows cold air in. Any moisture will drain outdoors, leaving you with cracked and dry skin.

Unfortunately, you can over-humidify your house as well. Too much humidity in the winter can damage windows as ice forms. If this happens, moisture will most likely be present in walls and attics, causing sheathing and woodwork to rot over time. This not only damages your house, but the mold can make you sick.
What do you do then?

The solution needs to keep your home’s humidity at a happy medium. The percentage of optimum humidity changes as it gets colder.

Outside Temperature
Max Humidity
20 – 40 40%
10 – 20 35%
0 – 10 30%
-10 – 0 25%
-20 – -10 20%
Below -20 15%

*Based on an indoor temperature of 70 degrees F

You can improve your humidity levels and your heating bills by caulking and sealing your windows and doors. Next, you can maintain indoor humidity levels with a home humidifier. When your home’s humidity falls below the optimum level, a whole-home humidifier from Aprilaire goes to work, adding moisture to your dry air. This dry air is forced through the water panel evaporator and is distributed throughout your home, eliminating that parched, dry air lurking in your home. Aiprilaire offers humidifiers that are energy efficient, reduce airborne viruses, and protect wood floors or furniture.

Eliminate the damage and discomfort caused by dry air. We’re currently offering $25 off the installation of an Aprilaire Whole-house Humidifier. Offer ends December 31st. Call us today!

This entry was posted in Humidifier,Winter and tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

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